Category: Artists

Paul Brainard

Artist Q&A with Paul Brainard

“Lexicon Leader”, oil on linen, 40 x 55 in | 102 x 140 cm, oil on linen, 2020

Why did you become an artist?

I really don’t think that I had a choice. Making art is something that i do every single day; it is in my blood.

Paul Brainard, self portrait with child

How is your work different than everything else out there?

II think that it is an interesting blend of the absurdity of existence, modernist formalism and vulnerable self effacement. 

What’s different about your current body of work?

I am simultaneously trying to combine elements of the personal and the formal in a way that makes a very diverse visual language.

“Moron at the Genius Bar”, oil on linen, 18 x 17 in | 45 x 42 cm, 2020

What’s coming up for you?

I just did two shows back-to-back at the Java Project Brooklyn. The first one “Covid Kids Club” was work that was made during the Covid – 19 lockdown in NYC. March and April were especially difficult in Queens with constant sirens and death all around you. I was a few miles from the epicenter of the epicenter of Covid -19 in the first wave, so it was comforting to stay home and make art. The second show at the Jave Project is “The boring Gaze” a group show of NYC and Danish Artists co-rated by myself and Frodo Mikkelsen. It was very difficult to install 15 artists in such a confined space but i am very happy with the result . The gallery is open by appointment from November 7th to December 7th, 2020.

What advice would you give to an artist just starting out today?

Listen to your own inner voice because this is the thing that makes you a … Click here to read more

Lin Evola

Artist Q&A with Lin Evola

“Peace Sign”, watercolor, ink, and decommissioned nuclear stainless steel, 32 x 24 in | 81 x 61 cm, 2015

Why did you become an artist?

I learned to walk and talk at the same time that I began to draw, and I continued to make art as I grew up.  At 10 years old my mother took a group of us children to The Art Institute of Chicago. I remember very distinctly how I felt when I looked up and witnessed huge paintings by Jackson Pollock and Robert Motherwell – which became known as Abstract Expressionism – hanging on all the walls around us. I felt like my skin was turned inside out. I knew who I was.

How is your work different than everything else out there?

Every artist discovers their own visual language that is based on how we see, how we hold our tools, and what tools we choose to make art. My art is produced partially or completely from metal from weapons. I use a lot of reflective surfaces to engage the viewer in reaching a conceptual interaction with the art itself.

Lin Evola, portrait by Udo Spreitzenbarth 

What’s different about your current body of work?

Visually my art adds information and layers of meanings, staying tight to the basic empowerment for humanity to build peace.  Implementing physics, numbers, and writing, I use a tempo bringing the viewer from a microcosm to a macrocosm in vision. Are you looking at a microscopic image? Is it pulsating? Are you looking at outer space?  The layouts of the Peace Signs take about a month. I mix my own paints from pigment, and often include the weapons metal in the ink.

What’s coming up for you?

The Peace Angels Project is working on the 12 … Click here to read more

Eva Petrič

Artist Q&A with Eva Petrič

“Collective Heart”, found handmade lace assemblage, (St. Stephans Cathedral, Vienna, Austria), 2016

Why did you become an artist?

I do not think it was really a choice, but more like a calling. It was something that chose me. As far back as I can remember, I have always been creating or taking part in something artistic, having to do with music, dance, or performance. Mostly, I am drawn to the quality of art as a means of translating something negative into positive, as a means of healing. And art as a language of uniting people through the language of metaphors activated by the fusion of our various senses.

How is your work different than everything out there?

I think to say that my work is different than anything else out there would be quite ignorant and too confident. Perhaps the only way I could say it is different than anything else out there is that every human, every life is a unique being and irreplicable in the sum of thier experiences, and so also my artwork when, attempted to be transcribed by someone to its last detail is impossible. We, each and every one of us has a unique life, with unique experiences that interrelate in a yet even more unique way and besides this, when we include also the perspective of the inner reality of each and every one of us then this becomes a whole new reality, non-transcribable in its entirety as we are dealing with other physical laws. One thing people have commented to me about my work is that it takes on a unique approach of combining materials and thoughts that one would not think could be combined, and that yet, the end result is luring and esthetic and thought provoking. … Click here to read more