Patricia Abramovich

Artist Q&A with Patricia Abramovich

“Psifas 2”, oil on canvas, 31 x 39 in | 80 x 100 cm, 2009

Why did you become an artist?

I always have been creative. I loved to draw from just an early age, learned to play piano and guitar, and wrote poetry as a teenager.  I began to paint again at the age of 40, and it was a became a sort of obsession where I painted every free minute I had. In 2009 I published some of my paintings on several art sites, and was invited to show at the Biennale in Florence soon after. I think that is the exact time I would say I became an artist.

How is your work different than everything out there?

“Patricia Abramovich presents colorful abstract paintings, with almost sculptural strokes of frenetic color forming the basis of the painting’s composition. The oil on canvas works are performed in spectacular colors that show great boldness, expressing the personal language developed by the artist over the years, a coloristic language with an identifying character and presence. In this completely abstract and well-constructed language, the paintings are made of strokes of color, placed in an intensive process using only a spatula on the canvas.”

Daniella Talmor

I always search for different ways and new techniques, and always painting from my imagination. Sometimes I look at inspiring landscapes, whereas other times I just put color on the canvas or paper giving my hands total freedom. It almost feels as the painting appears by itself. The moment I look at the blank surface brings an exciting feeling, as my next creation is on its way. I need to be totally in the mood with nothing around me, only my painter knife or water moving the colors on the paper. It is only me and the creation. What a joyous feeling!

Patricia Abramovich, self portrait

What’s different about your current body of work?

I painted a lot over the last three months with the shock I felt with the pandemic. Before COVID-19 I used to make large canvases, and now I’m in a different state of mind, painting small watercolors and even miniature paintings. With a new state of mind I also began to paint with acrylic and now have a body of art on paper with very pleasing results. After the lockdown I will probably revert to painting on large canvases as before.

What’s coming up for you?

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Jerry Kirk

Artist Q&A with Jerry Kirk

“A King, A Clown, and Businessman”, acrylic on wood, 36 x 60 in | 91 x 152 cm, 2019

Why did you become an artist?

It was never a question of why. I began making art the moment that I was old enough to hold a crayon in my hand and never had a thought to being anything but an artist. I’ve been making art and have been an artist my entire life.

How is your work different than everything out there?

My work is different because of the variety of styles and themes that I incorporate. Unlike most artists who find their niche or one style and stick to that I like to follow my muse wherever she leads. From neo-realistic landscapes to expressive figurative and narrative paintings my work is basically all over the place. To work in one style pursuing the same theme or genre over and over would bore me so I choose to do it all and by doing so, I believe, grow and evolve more as an artist. The media that I choose to work in is also a variety – from painting to drawing to digital. I also write poetry. My art is about expressing whatever my soul desires in any way that I can. I think that this sets me apart from other artists and makes my art different. 

Jerry Kirk, self portrait

What’s different about your current body of work?

Lately I have been pursuing expressionistic land and streetscapes along with politically and socially themed narrative paintings. After 30 years of living in one place I recently moved to a different state and this new local is infusing my land and streetscape paintings with a different look and feel; more expressionism than realism. The current social and political environment that we are all living in is filling me with the need to express my opinions and concerns on canvas. This is giving my narrative paintings a harder edged focus and statement.

What’s coming up for you?

Having recently moved to a different city I am slowly working my way into the local art scene. I also recently self-published a book of poems and drawings.

Who are some of your favorite emerging artists that no one else has heard of?

There are several artists who I think are great and need to be discovered beyond their local … Click here to read more

Lily Qian

Artist Q&A with Lily Qian

“The Swimmer”, digital, 2020

Why did you become an artist?

I was fortunate to have had a bohemian childhood. At a young age, I was encouraged to draw, read, and take dance classes. I was born into an artist family: my father was the Dean of the oil painting department at Beijing University and my mother was a ballet dancer and an award-winning costume designer. My father told me he wanted me to be an artist because it’s something I will always have no matter what happens in life. I became interested in illustration, design, and children’s books because it’s about creating art for everyone.

What’s different about your current body of work?

I always begin a project with drawing by hand first. I have a diverse range and enjoy working with a variety of materials from ink, watercolor, charcoal, and digital. For a long time, I was interested in studying people through portraiture and figurative works. My current work is a departure from the figure and more about exploring ideas and storytelling.

Lily Qian, photo by Nathan Rocky

What’s coming up for you?

When I’m not busy with an illustration assignment, I’m creating new work for my portfolio. My next goal is to write and illustrate children’s books. Currently, I’m working with Christian Dior Couture on special fashion illustration assignments. Since 2017, I’ve partnered with Others Trade for Hope to design and develop handmade textile goods to support a small group of female artisans and their families in Bangladesh. It’s important for me to give back, and find a place where my work would also inspire others to fuller and happier lives. 

“Kayak”, digital, 2020

To learn more about Lily and her work, please visit www.lily-qian.com/illustration.… Click here to read more