Category: Q&A

Sajal Sarkar

Artist Q&A with Sajal Sarkar

As an artist of Indian diaspora in the US, Sajal Sarkar has stepped out of his comfort zone and began exploring uncharted avenues. Embracing fresh ideas by casting aside over-saturated ones is part of his nature, but he had not indulged in it enough in the middle phase of life in Baroda. Human figuration dominated his visual thinking, hardly allowing any other experimental possibilities. In fact, a couple of years before moving to the US, he fully recognized the stagnancy in his thinking and creative output, which was devoid of anything fresh and provocative.

“Beyond Life 1”, pen and India ink on Nepalese Lokta paper, 24 x 24 in | 61 x 61 cm, 2021

Who is your favorite artist of all time?

It’s the most difficult question to answer as my art career passed through three distinct chapters and in each chapter, there is some great artist’s name I can remember who is still as significant as thirty years ago. In the initial stage after my undergraduate studies in Kolkata, two Indian artists, both from my homeland Bengal named Somenath Hore and Ramkinkar Baij, and two European artists named Kathe Kollwitz and Egon Schiele were my most favorite. After my move to the Western region of India to study printmaking in Baroda, my interest turned towards the work of Bhupen Khakkar, Nasreen Mohamedi, Zarina Hasmi, and Krishna Reddy. All four of them made a mark internationally for their unique quality of work. After migrating to the USA my new favorites became Sol Lewitt, James Turrell, and Louise Bourgeois, Alberto Giacometti to name a few. 

How did you become a professional artist?

My parents were the ones responsible for my artistic life and it’s a blessing to have such parents. Though my father, who had … Click here to read more

Paula Cahill

Artist Q&A with Paula Cahill

Paula Cahill is a contemporary American artist. She is known for her dark blue paintings composed with a single, continuous line reminiscent of the bioluminescent light that emanates from sea-life at deep, dark depths. Born in Detroit, Michigan, Paula relocated to the Northeast where she received merit and academic scholarships while pursuing an education in the arts. She holds an MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and a BFA from Tyler School of Art and Architecture. She also studied at the Art Students League of New York and Parsons School of Design as a transfer student.

“Awry”, oil on panel, 24 x 24 in | 61 x 61 cm, 2021

Who is your favorite artist of all time?

I have so many favorite artists, but if I could have one famous painting, it would be a van Gogh.

How did you become a professional artist?

I attended art school later in life. After graduation I spent several years experimenting with abstraction. In 2017, I created a body of work that I felt comfortable with and began to seek out opportunities to exhibit and offer my work to the public.

What are the influences and inspirations in your work?

Line.

Paula Cahill, self-portrait.

How is your work different than everything else out there?

My work is composed with a single line that changes color and often connects back to itself seamlessly. I’m sure it’s been done before, but I haven’t seen any paintings quite like the current work.

When is a piece finished for you?

When I’m satisfied with the composition and examined every inch of the surface to make sure that the edges are clean, the colors are right, and the paint application is correct. It’s a very labor intense process.

What’s different

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Matt Roe

Artist Q&A with Matt Roe

Matt Roe has been showing international for over 20 years in galleries, art festivals, and digitally. The world has changed since he started creating a long time ago along with reproduction techniques, technology has also fused its way into our general living space. This same process of human evolution has pushed him in that direction when it comes to art and his creative process. Roe has always had a passion for pushing the bounds of creative talent whether it be framing artwork, digital photography, or with abstract works in which he tries to push the bounds of each technique in their own regard.

Every creative path has advanced on its own including his passion for photography and creating digital artwork. The artist discovered a process where a photo is fused onto high gloss aluminum using attributes from the metal to highlight the details of the digital artwork, much the depth of brushwork with paint. This style comes to life in different lighting and produces a life of its own well beyond what the original photograph looked like.

“Driftwood Debris”, digital photography fused onto high gloss aluminum , 20 x 28 in | 51 x 71 cm, 2021

Who is your favorite artist of all time?

For me it’s not all about one artist at all. I’ve been influenced by many different artists through many different times in life. In my early days of creating, it was Dali, Dr Seuss, and Van Gogh. Dali was for his symbolism, Dr. Seuss for creating a whole world from what he saw in his everyday existence, and Van Gogh for his use of texture and color. Today I would say the street artists that make sociological commentaries in their work in all forms of creating, and Warhol for his … Click here to read more